The Brazil French Press coffee maker, designed in the early 80's, was Bodum's first coffee maker and quickly became a symbol of what Bodum stands for. Attractive and functional design at an affordable price! The Brazil has a heat resistant, borosilicate glass beaker (the standard for all Bodum French press plungers) and a polypropylene handle and base, which make the Brazil easy to use and easy to clean. The domed lid is made of a smooth polypropylene and has the special Bodum safety and aroma...
A cafetiere (Coffee Plunger, French press in US English) requires coffee of a coarser grind than does a drip brew coffee filter, as finer grounds will seep through the press filter and into the coffee.[2] Coffee is brewed by placing the coffee and water together, stirring it and leaving to brew for a few minutes, then pressing the plunger to trap the coffee grounds at the bottom of the beaker.

“I purchased the machine for myself as a birthday present, and I’ve had it for about six weeks. We have a Pavoni espresso machine, which my husband loves for his espressos, but I think it’s a pain for making lattes: grinding the beans, tamping down the pod, ‘pulling’ the lever (which will be really hard if you tamp it too densely), steaming the milk, and then cleaning the steaming wand, not to mention what a pain it is to refill the water chamber (turn off, wait till pressure is gone, then you can refill). Why am I listing all of these steps? Because that’s what you don’t have to worry about with the Lattissima! Here are my steps now: Turn on the machine, get the milk container out of the fridge and plug it into the front, put an espresso capsule in the top, stick a mug under the spout, and push the Latte button. Done. You do need to clean the frother, which is just putting another cup under the spout, turn the milk to “clean” and let it clean, then you can remove the milk container and stick it in the fridge. I clean the milk container once a week, soaking all the pieces in a bowl of hot, soapy water for a few hours.”
This testing was designed to highlight the difference in how each machine extracted its coffee grounds. Remember, extraction is tied to water temperature, how long the grounds had to steep, and how evenly that water is distributed in the brew basket. (Depending on how the machine distributes the water and the shape of the basket, any particular ground may or may not receive the same amount of time in contact with water — thus any individual grind may be over-extracted, under-extracted, or just right.) Properly extracted grounds would have a balance of notes and aromas, from slight hints of acid to a pleasant amount of bitterness.
For hundreds of years, making a cup of coffee was a simple process. Roasted and ground coffee beans were placed in a pot or pan, to which hot water was added, followed by attachment of a lid to commence the infusion process. Pots were designed specifically for brewing coffee, all with the purpose of trying to trap the coffee grounds before the coffee is poured. Typical designs feature a pot with a flat expanded bottom to catch sinking grounds and a sharp pour spout that traps the floating grinds. Other designs feature a wide bulge in the middle of the pot to catch grounds when coffee is poured.
A cafetiere (Coffee Plunger, French press in US English) requires coffee of a coarser grind than does a drip brew coffee filter, as finer grounds will seep through the press filter and into the coffee.[2] Coffee is brewed by placing the coffee and water together, stirring it and leaving to brew for a few minutes, then pressing the plunger to trap the coffee grounds at the bottom of the beaker.
An electric drip coffee maker can also be referred to as a dripolator. It normally works by admitting water from a cold water reservoir into a flexible hose in the base of the reservoir leading directly to a thin metal tube or heating chamber (usually, of aluminum), where a heating element surrounding the metal tube heats the water. The heated water moves through the machine using the thermosiphon principle. Thermally-induced pressure and the siphoning effect move the heated water through an insulated rubber or vinyl riser hose, into a spray head, and onto the ground coffee, which is contained in a brew basket mounted below the spray head. The coffee passes through a filter and drips down into the carafe. A one-way valve in the tubing prevents water from siphoning back into the reservoir. A thermostat attached to the heating element turns off the heating element as needed to prevent overheating the water in the metal tube (overheating would produce only steam in the supply hose), then turns back on when the water cools below a certain threshold. For a standard 10-12 cup drip coffeemaker, using a more powerful thermostatically-controlled heating element (in terms of wattage produced), can heat increased amounts of water more quickly using larger heating chambers, generally producing higher average water temperatures at the spray head over the entire brewing cycle. This process can be further improved by changing the aluminum construction of most heating chambers to a metal with superior heat transfer qualities, such as copper.
Making espresso in my old, classic Italian-style Moka machine takes about 10 to 12 minutes — and a bunch of elbow grease. My drip-maker for a classic American cup of joe takes even longer. My brewing cone for pour-over coffee requires me to boil water — and it can't make espresso. And my French press needs about 20 minutes to steep. Plus, it makes too much coffee and I find it's best reserved for fancier brunches.
These organizations consider how long it takes you to brew the coffee, the social impact of the coffee maker, as well as the roasting ability of the coffee maker. The best coffee maker will be BPA free and certified. An SCAA certified coffee maker, for example, will be able to deliver water at optimum temperatures throughout the whole brewing process, without compromising the integrity of the coffee at any point.​
The Mr. Coffee DRX5 coffee maker gives you the advanced action to delay-brew your coffee, enabling you to wake up to coffee waiting for you. The auto pause and grab a cup option allows you to get a cup of coffee before the brew cycle is finished, with the machine halting the brewing process so you can pour a cup and then complete the process once you reinsert the carafe into the chassis.
We’re the largest online retailer of espresso machines and it’s no secret why. We love coffee. We love that first sip in the morning, the one that you’ve got to fight to get to your mouth because 8 hours of sleep seems like a pipe dream. We love that rush, when the caffeine kicks in and you know that you’ve got the day in the palm of your hand. We love the art – brewing, roasting, tasting – and the journey that each coffee drinker takes in search of their perfect joe. We’ve been sharing that love with the world since 1997 and we hope you’ll pull up a cup and join us in celebration of nature’s most perfect beverage, coffee!
The point of getting a great machine is that it takes the fuss out of your coffee making — if you’re going to fiddle around so much, why not just get a Chemex? But our refrain throughout this entire review has been that a coffee maker is only one part of the good-cup equation. Some methodical experimentation could reveal a whole world of taste you never knew you could achieve.
Brewing coffee has never been easier with this Black & Decker 12-Cup Switch Coffee maker. With the switch of a button, you’re coffee will start brewing into the reinforced glass Duralife™ carafe with a comfort grip handle. Grab a cup of coffee on the go with the Sneak-A-Cup™ feature, otherwise your coffee will be ready when you are with the Keep Warm carafe nonstick carafe plate.

The illy name is most often associated with their coffee, but they also make capsule-style machines for convenient home brewing. This model takes less space than the similar Y3 model, but still has features that coffee lovers look for. It brews standard drip coffee, and it makes espresso with 19 bars of pressure. No matter what you’re brewing, you can choose your brew strength, water temperature, and cup size, for the perfect cup every time.
CR’s take: For $80, this Mr. Coffee 12-cup drip brewer is surprisingly stylish. Its airy design sets it apart from the blocky shapes common to the category. This model earns a rating of Very Good in CR’s brew-performance tests and makes a full pot in just 9 minutes. It offers brew-strength control, programming, and a permanent coffee filter. With its performance and striking appearance, you might not mind having it out on the counter—especially in a kitchen with a stainless fridge and range. 
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