In France, in about 1710, the Infusion brewing process was introduced. This involved submersing the ground coffee, usually enclosed in a linen bag, in hot water and letting it steep or "infuse" until the desired strength brew was achieved. Nevertheless, throughout the 19th and even the early 20th centuries, it was considered adequate to add ground coffee to hot water in a pot or pan, boil it until it smelled right, and pour the brew into a cup.

CR’s take: This Cuisinart drip coffee maker with a stainless steel finish and glass carafe earns an Excellent rating for brew performance. It’s programmable and features a water filter, a permanent coffee filter, cleaning mode, a cleaning indicator, and auto-shutoff. The machine also allows you to adjust the strength of your brew. For the money, this model offers style and features that are hard to beat. If you can live without the built-in grinder of the Cuisinart Burr Grind & Brew above, you can save yourself some money and still enjoy Cuisinart quality for a lot less.
The principle of a vacuum brewer was to heat water in a lower vessel until expansion forced the contents through a narrow tube into an upper vessel containing ground coffee. When the lower vessel was empty and sufficient brewing time had elapsed, the heat was removed and the resulting vacuum would draw the brewed coffee back through a strainer into the lower chamber, from which it could be decanted. The Bauhaus interpretation of this device can be seen in Gerhard Marcks' Sintrax coffee maker of 1925.
Feature-filled and powerful, the K475 Single-Serve K-Cup Pod Coffee Maker features customizable settings including strength and temperature control to deliver a truly premium brewing experience. Brew five different cup sizes – from 4 to 12 oz. with K-Cup(R) pods – plus the ability to brew a mug or carafe, the product brews a perfectly sized beverage for any occasion. Brewing your favorite beverage is easy thanks to the large color touchscreen, complete with separate settings for specialty...
That said, it’s not as elegant to use as the OXO machines. (Nor is it as nice to look at. One tester described its tall, bulbous body and squat carafe as “UFO-like.”) Take its eight-button controls, for example, which you use to toggle among brew modes, scroll up and down within the menu, and engage a manual brewing feature. Programming it to start brewing at a certain time was about as intuitive as setting an alarm on a clock radio — easy enough, but more technical than sleek. OXO definitely feels like the future; Behmor is more, “If it ain’t broke, why fix it?”
Some machines come with all the accessories you need to make espresso, but others don't. Check to see if your machine includes any accessories before you buy them. You will need a grinder to have freshly ground espresso, a milk frother or a milk frothing pitcher if you like foamy milk for cappuccinos or lattes, and a tamper to press down the coffee grounds before you make espresso. We explain why you need each one and recommend which ones to buy below:
“Strength, blend, decaf, cream, or sugar, there are many options when it comes to a cup of coffee. It seems every person has his or her own unique preferences to get them that perfect cup of joe. However, one factor that was often out of the home-coffee fan’s control was temperature. You either drank it at the temperature it came out of the coffee maker or you let it cool somewhat before sipping began. Cuisinart has aimed to turn that limitation on its head. This Cuisinart DCC-3650 adds a temperature control. It actually brews the coffee at one of three different user-defined temperatures. Impressive.”

The moka pot is most commonly used in Europe and in Latin America. It has become an iconic design, displayed in modern industrial art and design museums such as the Wolfsonian- FIU, Museum of Modern Art, the Cooper–Hewitt, National Design Museum, the Design Museum, and the London Science Museum. Moka pots come in different sizes, from one to eighteen 50 ml cups. The original design and many current models are made from aluminium with bakelite handles.


Like the OXO machines, it has only one button on its interface. Unlike the OXO machines, that button does only one thing: start the brewing process. If you hold it down until it blinks, you’ll activate the pre-infusion; otherwise a simple click gets it going. Brewing a full pot of eight cups took us about seven minutes, by far the fastest of any of our top picks — which is a good thing, considering you can’t program it to start brewing before you wake up.

“I am a coffee snob, and one of my favorite things about traveling to Europe is their espresso and cappuccinos. A couple years ago, I bought a Nespresso Aeroccino machine for making froth and a stovetop Moka pot for making espresso; the system has worked fine, but the espresso can take awhile to make (around 5-8 minutes) and there’s definitely a learning curve to making good coffee with it. … [How] does this machine do [in comparison]? Stellar. Absolutely stellar. Once the water is in and it heats up, you flip up a lever, drop in the pod, and press the size button (espresso or lungo). Off it goes! Brewing is super quick and the espresso always comes out with a beautiful crema on top. My first drink was a cappuccino, and it was so much better than the ones I’ve been making with my Moka pot! …


For example, if your coffee tastes a bit salty or sour, the grounds are under-extracted, which can be remedied by a finer grind. But what if only some of your grounds are too coarse, and others are too fine – and maybe some are just right? Having uniform grind size throughout your brew basket makes it easier to isolate and adjust this variable in order to get the level of extraction you want. The only way to achieve that is with a burr grinder. Miller — as well as a handful of our other experts — recommends the Barazata Encore Coffee Grinder ($129).
Breville Oracle Espresso Maker. Maintains temperature to within 1.35 degrees of optimum brewing temperature during extraction for fullest flavor. Model #BES980XL. Separate air pump allows for customized milk frothing: select latte or cappuccino and the machine automatically adjusts the amount of froth, while a sensor detects when milk has reached the ideal temperature.
†Programmable Brew Time: Conventional wisdom frowns at grinding beans early and programming a pot to brew later. The aromatic compounds in coffee beans start to oxidize as quickly as 15 minutes after grinding, which causes coffee to start losing aroma and flavor. But Michael Ebert, senior consultant at Firedancer Coffee Consultants, LLC, assured us that, given the trade-offs for convenience, “grinding the night before will still make a great coffee — just not as great as it could be.” Seven of the 10 pots we tested are programmable, including three of our top picks (all but the Bonavita).
The illy name is most often associated with their coffee, but they also make capsule-style machines for convenient home brewing. This model takes less space than the similar Y3 model, but still has features that coffee lovers look for. It brews standard drip coffee, and it makes espresso with 19 bars of pressure. No matter what you’re brewing, you can choose your brew strength, water temperature, and cup size, for the perfect cup every time.
Making espresso in my old, classic Italian-style Moka machine takes about 10 to 12 minutes — and a bunch of elbow grease. My drip-maker for a classic American cup of joe takes even longer. My brewing cone for pour-over coffee requires me to boil water — and it can't make espresso. And my French press needs about 20 minutes to steep. Plus, it makes too much coffee and I find it's best reserved for fancier brunches.
Looking for a coffee machine that revolves around your busy schedule? Wake up to the delicious aroma of freshly brewed coffee with the 24-hour digital timer that automatically gets your coffee ready for you. In a rush? Not to worry, the pause-and-serve function allows you to pour yourself a coffee partway through the brewing process without any drips or disruption. Perfect coffee should never be compromised. De’Longhi combination coffee espresso machines are carefully crafted for coffee lovers searching for a machine that achieves a harmony of excellence and convenience. Sleek, stylish and durable, a De’Longhi machine is at home in any kitchen.

The well-designed Braun BrewSense came closer to the gold standard for water brewing temperature than almost any other drip coffee maker in our testing, and delivered a rich, bold and hot cup of coffee. It has settings to program the coffee to brew ahead of time and you can adjust the brew strength and the temperature of the warming plate. Also available in black.
This K-Elite Single-Serve K-Cup Pod Coffee Maker blend premium finish and programmable features together to deliver both modern design and the ultimate in beverage customization. It’s a stylish addition to any kitchen. Features strong brew setting when you want to brew a bolder cup of coffee, and an ice setting to brew hot over ice for a refreshing, full-flavored ice coffee.

That said, it’s not as elegant to use as the OXO machines. (Nor is it as nice to look at. One tester described its tall, bulbous body and squat carafe as “UFO-like.”) Take its eight-button controls, for example, which you use to toggle among brew modes, scroll up and down within the menu, and engage a manual brewing feature. Programming it to start brewing at a certain time was about as intuitive as setting an alarm on a clock radio — easy enough, but more technical than sleek. OXO definitely feels like the future; Behmor is more, “If it ain’t broke, why fix it?”
ON THE GO - Compact, solid, hand-powered portable coffee machine for perfect espresso on the go – and compatible with Nespresso® capsules! HAND POWERED - The Minipresso is a miracle of coffee preparation - a hand-powered espresso machine that is both pleasing on the eye and amazingly adept at performing its core task. The inventors wanted an instrument that would enable them to have a great cup of caffeinated goodness wherever they were. LIGHT & COMPACT - This device packs an enormous punch for its slight weight and size (360 grams and 17.5cms in length).
An early variant technique, called a balance siphon, was to have the two chambers arranged side-by-side on a sort of scale-like device, with a counterweight attached opposite the initial (or heating) chamber. Once the near-boiling water was forced from the heating chamber into the brewing one, the counterweight was activated, causing a spring-loaded snuffer to come down over the flame, thus turning "off" the heat, and allowing the cooled water to return to the original chamber. In this way, a sort of primitive 'automatic' brewing method was achieved.

Here at the Strategist, we like to think of ourselves as crazy (in the good way) about the stuff we buy, but as much as we’d like to, we can’t try everything. Which is why we have People’s Choice, in which we find the best-reviewed (that’s four-to-five-star reviews and lots of ‘em) products and single out the most convincing. Here, the best coffee makers on Amazon, according to the people (note that reviews have been edited for length and clarity). Note that we’ve already talked to coffee snobs to find out their favorites, and also picked out the best espresso makers, too. And if you’re curious about coffee grinders, pour-over coffee set-ups and French-presses, we’ve got those as well.


This multi-functional brewer uses espresso, coffee, tea and milk pods to give you drinks just like your favorite barista makes. The machines automatically uses different levels of pressure to create various beverages, such as high-pressure extraction for espresso to low pressure for regular coffee. The sleek design will look right at home on your counter, and the water reservoir can be detached for easy refills.

CR’s take: This Cuisinart drip coffee maker with a stainless steel finish and glass carafe earns an Excellent rating for brew performance. It’s programmable and features a water filter, a permanent coffee filter, cleaning mode, a cleaning indicator, and auto-shutoff. The machine also allows you to adjust the strength of your brew. For the money, this model offers style and features that are hard to beat. If you can live without the built-in grinder of the Cuisinart Burr Grind & Brew above, you can save yourself some money and still enjoy Cuisinart quality for a lot less.
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