‡Pre-Infusing: Pre-infusing is a technique where the dry coffee grounds are initially saturated with hot water, allowing a “bloom” of carbon dioxide to escape. This 45-second(ish) process puts hot water into contact with more surface area around each ground throughout the brewing process, as it’s no longer competing with the escaping gas bubbles. It can improve the quality of the final product, since this more uniform contact creates a more even extraction. It’s a feature that six of the 10 pots we tested incorporated into their designs — as well as all four of our top picks.

If you make your coffee at home, you want to make sure that you’re getting a great-tasting and convenient cup of coffee whenever possible. The best way to do this is to invest in the right equipment. In the home, no piece of coffee equipment is more important than the coffee maker. In most cases, you add the water and the grounds, and the coffee maker takes care of the rest. With many types of coffee makers available on the market today—including French presses, stovetop makers, pour overs and traditional drip coffee brewers—it can be difficult to choose the right one for your needs.
An electric drip coffee maker can also be referred to as a dripolator. It normally works by admitting water from a cold water reservoir into a flexible hose in the base of the reservoir leading directly to a thin metal tube or heating chamber (usually, of aluminum), where a heating element surrounding the metal tube heats the water. The heated water moves through the machine using the thermosiphon principle. Thermally-induced pressure and the siphoning effect move the heated water through an insulated rubber or vinyl riser hose, into a spray head, and onto the ground coffee, which is contained in a brew basket mounted below the spray head. The coffee passes through a filter and drips down into the carafe. A one-way valve in the tubing prevents water from siphoning back into the reservoir. A thermostat attached to the heating element turns off the heating element as needed to prevent overheating the water in the metal tube (overheating would produce only steam in the supply hose), then turns back on when the water cools below a certain threshold. For a standard 10-12 cup drip coffeemaker, using a more powerful thermostatically-controlled heating element (in terms of wattage produced), can heat increased amounts of water more quickly using larger heating chambers, generally producing higher average water temperatures at the spray head over the entire brewing cycle. This process can be further improved by changing the aluminum construction of most heating chambers to a metal with superior heat transfer qualities, such as copper.

One of the most recognizable and best-selling K-Classic™ K55 Single-Serve K-Cup Pod Coffee Maker, the product blends original design and outstanding features into one popular package. The K-Classic™ coffee maker brews a delicious cup in under a minute at the touch of a button. With hundreds of delicious K-Cup® pod varieties – coffee, tea, hot cocoa, and iced beverages, there’s something for everyone to enjoy. Choose from multiple brew sizes – 6, 8, and 10 oz. – to create your...

Make yourself a perfect cup of coffee with this Bunn Pour-O-Matic Two-Burner Pour-Over Coffee Brewer. It can be a great addition to your kitchen thanks to its simple design and structure that lends it a neat appeal. The automatic coffee maker has a basket filter and shower style brew head. The Pour-O-Matic Two-Burner Pour-Over Coffee Brewer from Bunn is made from metal and plastic, which ensures years of reliability. It has a black finish that accentuates its design and overall appeal. This...


Integral to De’Longhi’s brand values are quality, reliability and timeless style. Our combination coffee espresso machines, like all our products and appliances, are subjected to rigorous quality checks. These top of the range machines are still designed, produced, and assembled by hand in long established Italian production sites. When you make coffee with a De’Longhi machine, feel safe in the knowledge that you have over a century of our expertise behind you with every cup.
This grinder produced the most even grounds out of all the machines I tested, and its range of output is all-encompassing. The coarsest setting produces large flakes, while the finest setting produces puffy grounds akin to powdered sugar—perfect for Turkish coffee. In between, I was quickly able to find the ideal settings for my Hario Woodneck, Aeropress, and even mason jar cold brew.
Percolators began to be developed from the mid-nineteenth century. In the United States, James H. Mason of Massachusetts patented an early percolator design in 1865. An Illinois farmer named Hanson Goodrich is generally credited with patenting the modern percolator. Goodrich's patent was granted on August 16, 1889, and his patent description varies little from the stovetop percolators sold today. With the percolator design, water is heated in a boiling pot with a removable lid, until the heated water is forced through a metal tube into a brew basket containing coffee. The extracted liquid drains from the brew basket, where it drips back into the pot. This process is continually repeated during the brewing cycle until the liquid passing repeatedly through the grounds is sufficiently steeped. A clear sight chamber in the form of a transparent knob on the lid of the percolator enables the user to judge when the coffee has reached the proper color and strength.
That said, it’s not as elegant to use as the OXO machines. (Nor is it as nice to look at. One tester described its tall, bulbous body and squat carafe as “UFO-like.”) Take its eight-button controls, for example, which you use to toggle among brew modes, scroll up and down within the menu, and engage a manual brewing feature. Programming it to start brewing at a certain time was about as intuitive as setting an alarm on a clock radio — easy enough, but more technical than sleek. OXO definitely feels like the future; Behmor is more, “If it ain’t broke, why fix it?”
“I am a coffee snob, and one of my favorite things about traveling to Europe is their espresso and cappuccinos. A couple years ago, I bought a Nespresso Aeroccino machine for making froth and a stovetop Moka pot for making espresso; the system has worked fine, but the espresso can take awhile to make (around 5-8 minutes) and there’s definitely a learning curve to making good coffee with it. … [How] does this machine do [in comparison]? Stellar. Absolutely stellar. Once the water is in and it heats up, you flip up a lever, drop in the pod, and press the size button (espresso or lungo). Off it goes! Brewing is super quick and the espresso always comes out with a beautiful crema on top. My first drink was a cappuccino, and it was so much better than the ones I’ve been making with my Moka pot! …
Create coffee without limits. De’Longhi combination coffee espresso machines bring together the technology of espresso, steam, and drip coffee to give coffee lovers the freedom of choice with every cup. The sophisticated 3- in-1 design allows you to tailor each cup of coffee to suit your mood. Our combination coffee espresso machines will never make you choose between creamy cappuccinos and perfectly brewed drip coffees. It’s time to heighten your expectations.
A cafetiere (Coffee Plunger, French press in US English) requires coffee of a coarser grind than does a drip brew coffee filter, as finer grounds will seep through the press filter and into the coffee.[2] Coffee is brewed by placing the coffee and water together, stirring it and leaving to brew for a few minutes, then pressing the plunger to trap the coffee grounds at the bottom of the beaker.

Enjoy a cup of instant coffee with the Bodum Columbia Double Wall Stainless Steel French Press Coffee Maker. This coffee maker includes a French press & Bodum coffee scoop. It is available in multiple sizes allowing you to choose the one best suited to your preference. This coffee maker is made from premium quality stainless steel, nylon, silicone, and plastic, which ensures that it is sturdy and durable. This coffee maker is part of the Columbia collection, and sports a silver finish that is...


It’s obvious, but easy to forget: If you don’t clean out your coffee machine’s carafe after each use with soap and water, you’ll always end up tasting a little bit of yesterday’s now-bitter brew. Thermal carafes need to be hand-washed, but all the plastic components of our top picks — brew baskets, lids, etc. — are dishwasher-safe if you keep them on the top rack.
The Moccamaster isn't for everyone. Handmade in the Netherlands, it costs around $300—and would never win an award for value. It lacks a programmable timer, and it was also bit more difficult to set up than the rest of the coffee makers—in fact most were ready to go right out of the box. But a quick look at the instruction diagram should clear up any confusion, and the end result is well worth the effort.
Disclosure: This post is brought to you by Business Insider's Insider Picks team. We aim to highlight products and services you might find interesting, and if you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback. Have something you think we should know about? Email us at insiderpicks@businessinsider.com.
Try a new way to brew coffee if you’re tired of the same-old, same-old. We offer a variety of ways to brew up tasty hot beverages to fill your favorite coffee cup. Choose from standard drip machines with high volume carafes or durable thermal carafes. Pour-over brewers come in manual and automatic versions to create fast, hot cups of java goodness. Automatic versions heat water to industry standards in mere seconds and allow plenty of contact between hot water and beans to develop the coffee essences you love. Manual pour-over brewers have everything you need but the hot water to make your own coffee wherever you are. Order a teapot or automatic kettle to make quick cups of coffee without waiting for a machine to brew it for you. Go retro with a siphon-style coffee maker. You never have to use the stove for the electric versions of siphon brewers. A flip of a switch starts the process. Hot water vapor pushes through the top of the appliance to soak the ground coffee beans, and then the brew slowly drips back down into the carafe for a perfect cup of coffee.
×